Exhibitions

International Cooperation

“Bronze Age Mesopotamia and the Chengdu Plain”
Sichuan University Museum, Opening on October 21


For the first time: Historical Artifacts from Israel exhibited in China.

The Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem sent 15 ancient artifacts to go on display in an exhibition in Chendgu, China.  Opened on October 21 at the Sichuan University Museum. The exhibition entitled “Bronze Age Mesopotamia and the Chengdu Plain" compares the two great civilizations that developed in Mesopotamia and in the Chengdu Valley during the Bronze Age. Despite the many thousands of miles separating them, the exhibition reveals similarities between East and West.


The exhibition focuses on the two ancient civilizations that developed at the opposite extremities of Asia: Mesopotamia in the Middle East and the East Asian Chengdu Valley. Each of these civilizations had a decisive influence on the development of their entire respective regions, East Asia and the Middle East.


Director of Bible Lands Museum, Amanda Weiss:
"The Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem is a unique museum of ancient civilizations, presenting the history of the lands and civilizations mentioned in the Bible in relation to the development of the biblical narrative throughout the generations. The goal of the Museum is to connect each individual with their own heritage through the treasures on display.  Welcoming  visitors of all faiths and nationalities, it brings the universal narrative of the development of civilization to audiences through exhibitions, educational and cultural programs. The BLMJ is a universal center of education and culture and we are excited to take part in the first international exhibition  dedicated to ancient civilizations in the Sichuan University Museum"

 

Bronze mask gilded with gold, perhaps representing the face of a god or a king  Sanxindgui site, Chengdu Valley, China, late second millennium BCE

Bronze mask gilded with gold, perhaps representing the face of a god or a king
Sanxindgui site, Chengdu Valley, China, late second millennium BCE